Service Bus for Windows Server

Move over MSMQ, Service Bus for Windows Server was recently released.  Apparently it has been for awhile now (Oct 2012 release).  I’m just late to the party I guess.

Service Bus 1.0 was designed to allow for enterprise messaging capabilities in a Windows Server-based environment.  It enables you to build, test, and run loosely-coupled, message-driven applications in self-managed environments and on developer computers.  The two primary features are Service Bus Queues and Service Bus Topics and Subscriptions.

  • Service Bus Queues offer reliable message storage and retrieval with a choice of protocols and APIs. Use Service Bus queue in your application to provide load leveling by having the message receiver processing messages at its own pace or to provide load balancing by having multiple, competing receivers accepting messages from the same queue.

For more information on Service Bus queues refer to How to Use Service Bus Queues.

  • Service Bus Topics and Subscriptions offer (in addition to all of the queue’s) rich publish-subscribe capabilities allowing multiple, concurrent subscribers to independently retrieve filtered or unfiltered views of the published message stream.

If you are interested in or use messaging technology within your applications, this is some pretty exciting news.  Service Bus for Windows Server provides the same capabilities (Message Queues, Pub/Sub) as the Windows Azure Service Bus.  Best of all, it’s free.

It’s available for download now.  Also, check out the MSDN documentation.

Status Quo

In 2007 there was a movement in the .NET community dubbed “ALT.NET”.  A community was formed by individuals who believed there to be a “better” way from the tooling, frameworks, practices and principles provided by Microsoft.  The initial release of Linq to Entities (Entity Framework) was really a starting point for discussion since it did not support POCO’s and was not persistence ignorant.

ALT.NET was about challenging the status quo.  Although some might not be familiar with with the ALT.NET movement, you can thank it for helping the common practice of: Inversion of Control (Dependency Injection), Persistence Ignorant ORM’s, and SOLID principles.

So what happened to the community?  Was it a failure since it is no longer as active?  Or was it a success because many of the alternatives are now the “norm”?  I believe it to be both.

We need to continue challenging the status quo.  Individually and as a community.  Innovation and process improvement can only come from alternative thinking.  Have pride for the software you develop (Manifesto for Software Craftsmanship) and improve upon the existing practices.

CQRS: Read Model

Keep it simple.  There isn’t much of a need to go out of your way adding extra layers of abstraction.  Any data access framework or ORM you might be using will already be creating a good enough level of abstraction.  With linq (IQueryable) being implemented in NHibernate, Entity Framework, or Linq to SQL, ORM du jour, you already have your a level of abstraction to your data source.

Need to query your read model from the client? Single page application maybe?  Ok… you need one more layer.  OData to the rescue.  WCF Data Services provides an incredibly easy implementation with Entity Framework.  ASP.NET Web API does have an OData implementation but has limitations.

Keep it simple:

  • Data Source
  • Data Access Layer (ORM)
  • OData Layer – only if needed if client is making the query
  • Client