Roundup #46: .NET Core 1 EOL, EF Core 3.0, WCF OSS, Hidden Gems in .NET Core 3

Here are the things that caught my eye recently in .NET.  I’d love to hear what you found most interesting this week.  Let me know in the comments or on Twitter.

.NET Core 1.0/1.1 End of Life

Link: https://dotnet.microsoft.com/platform/support/policy/dotnet-core

Entity Framework Core 3.0 Preview 6 and Entity Framework 6.3 Preview 6

In recent months, a lot of our efforts have been focused on a new LINQ implementation for EF Core 3.0. Although the work isnā€™t complete and a lot of the intended functionality hasnā€™t been enabled, before preview 6 we reached a point in which we couldnā€™t make much more progress without integrating the new implementation into the codebase in the main branch.

More interesting for me is Entity Framework 6.3 which is to support .NET Standard 2.1. Reminder, that won’t be supported on .NET Framework as it is not intended to support netstandard2.1. Only .NET Core 3 as of this time will support netstandard2.1

Link: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/dotnet/announcing-entity-framework-core-3-0-preview-6-and-entity-framework-6-3-preview-6/

WF and WCF OSS projects

At the Build conference in May 2019, we mentioned that, after we add WinForms, WPF and Entity Framework 6 to .NET Core 3.0, we do not plan to add any more of the technologies from .NET Framework to .NET Core.

This means we will not be adding ASP.NET Web Forms, WCF, Windows Workflow, .NET Remoting and/or the various other smaller APIs to .NET Core. For new applications, there are better technologies that serve a similar purpose and provide more capabilities or better experiences. We think of .NET Core as the framework our customers will build brand new applications or port applications that they are still spending lots of engineering work on.

Link: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/dotnet/supporting-the-community-with-wf-and-wcf-oss-projects/

Hidden gems in .NET Core 3

You’ve likely heard about the headline features in .NET Core 3.0 including Blazor, gRPC, and Windows desktop app support, but what else is there? This is a big release so come and see David Fowler and Damian Edwards from the .NET Core team showcase their favorite new features you probably haven’t heard about in this demo-packed session.

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xdSSH63IZZc

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Roundup #42: Nancy, BuildXL, String Params, Rider, Infra Code

Here are the things that caught my eye this week in .NET.Ā  I’d love to hear what you found most interesting this week.Ā  Let me know in the comments or on Twitter.

Nancy 2.0.0

Pretty sure everyone has been using Nancy 2.0.0-clinteastwood in production for the past 2 years but regardless, official 2.0 release.

Link: https://www.nuget.org/packages/Nancy/

BuildXL

Build Accelerator, BuildXL for short, is a build engine originally developed for large internal teams at Microsoft, and owned by the Tools for Software EngineersĀ team, part of the Microsoft One Engineering System internal engineering group. Internally at Microsoft, BuildXL runs 30,000+ builds per day onĀ monorepoĀ codebases up to a half-terabyte in size with a half-million process executions per build, using distribution to thousands of datacenter machines and petabytes of source code, package, and build output caching. Thousands of developers use BuildXL on their desktops for faster builds even on mega-sized codebases.

Link: https://github.com/Microsoft/BuildXL

Efficient Params and String Formatting

This combination of features will increase the efficiency of formatting stringĀ values and passing ofĀ paramsĀ style arguments.

Link:https://github.com/dotnet/csharplang/blob/master/proposals/format.md

Rider 2019.1

Link https://www.jetbrains.com/rider/whatsnew/#v2019-1

5 Lessons Learned From Writing Over 300,000 Lines of Infrastructure Code

This talk is a concise masterclass on how to write infrastructure code. Iā€™ll share key lessons from the ā€œInfrastructure Cookbookā€ we developed at Gruntwork while creating and maintaining a library of over 300,000 lines of infrastructure code thatā€™s used in production by hundreds of companies. Come and hear our war stories, laugh about all the mistakes weā€™ve made along the way, and learn what Terraform, Packer, Docker, and Go look like in the wild. Topics include how to design infrastructure APIs, automated tests for infrastructure code, patterns for reuse and composition, patterns for zero-downtime deployments, refactoring, namespacing, versioning, CI / CD for infrastructure code, and more.

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTEgE2lcyk4

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Roundup #41: Apache Spark, Strongly Typed EntityIDs, Azure Workers, Automapper, NetCore3 Progress

Here are the things that caught my eye this week in .NET.Ā  I’d love to hear what you found most interesting this week.Ā  Let me know in the comments or on Twitter.

Introducing .NET for ApacheĀ® Sparkā„¢ Preview

TodayĀ atĀ Spark + AI summitĀ we areĀ excitedĀ toĀ announceĀ .NET for Apache Spark.Ā Spark is a popular openĀ sourceĀ distributed processing engineĀ for analytics over large data sets.Ā Spark can be used for processing batches of data, real-time streams, machine learning, and ad-hoc query.

Link: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/dotnet/introducing-net-for-apache-spark/

Using strongly-typed entity IDs to avoid primitive obsession

Have you ever requested an entity from a service (web API / database / generic service) and got a 404 / not found response when you’re sureĀ it exists? I’ve seen it quite a few times, and it sometimes comes down to requesting the entity using the wrong ID. In this post I show one way to avoid these sorts of errors by acknowledging the problem asĀ primitive obsession, and using the C# type system to catch the errors for us.

Link: https://andrewlock.net/using-strongly-typed-entity-ids-to-avoid-primitive-obsession-part-1/

.NET Core Workers in Azure Container Instances

In .NET Core 3.0 we are introducing a new type of application template called Worker Service. This template is intended to give you a starting point for writing long running services in .NET Core. In this walkthrough youā€™ll learn how to use a Worker with Azure Container RegistryĀ andĀ Azure Container InstancesĀ to get your Worker running as a microservice in the cloud.

Link: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/aspnet/dotnet-core-workers-in-azure-container-instances/

AutoMapper Usage Guidelines

A list of Do and Do Not for best practices if you’re using Automapper. I just saw that a new version was released and it made me think of this post.

Link: https://jimmybogard.com/automapper-usage-guidelines/

.NET Core 3.0 – progress on bugs, weekly update from 4/24

Link: https://twitter.com/ziki_cz/status/1121126233792585728

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