Roundup #51: .NET Core 3.0 launches at .NET Conf, .NET Standard adoption, Nullable Reference Types, Cake on Linux, Logging in ASPNET Core

Here are the things that caught my eye recently in .NET.  I’d love to hear what you found most interesting this week.  Let me know in the comments or on Twitter.

.NET Core 3.0 launches at .NET Conf

.NET Conf is a FREE, 3 day virtual developer event co-organized by the .NET community and Microsoft. This year .NET Core 3.0 will launch at .NET Conf 2019! Come celebrate and learn about the new release. You won’t want to miss this one.

Link: https://www.dotnetconf.net/

Update on .NET Standard adoption

It’s about two years ago that I announced .NET Standard 2.0. Since then we’ve been working hard to increase the set of .NET Standard-based libraries for .NET. This includes many of the BCL components, such as the Windows Compatibility Pack, but also other popular libraries, such as the JSON.NET, the Azure SDK, or the AWS SDK. In this blog post, I’ll share some thoughts and numbers about the .NET ecosystem and .NET Standard.

Link: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/dotnet/update-on-net-standard-adoption/

Try out Nullable Reference Types

With the release of .NET Core 3.0 Preview 7, C# 8.0 is considered “feature complete”. That means that the biggest feature of them all, Nullable Reference Types, is also locked down behavior-wise for the .NET Core release. It will continue to improve after C# 8.0, but it is now considered stable with the rest of C# 8.0.

Link: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/dotnet/try-out-nullable-reference-types/

How to build with Cake on Linux using Cake.CoreCLR or the Cake global tool

In this post I show two ways to use the Cake build system to build .NET Core projects on Linux: using the Cake.CoreCLR library, or the Cake.Tool .NET Core global tool.

Link: https://andrewlock.net/how-to-build-with-cake-on-linux-using-cake-coreclr-or-the-cake-global-tool/

Logging, Metrics and Events in ASP NET Core – Martin Thwaites

Providing decent monitoring of your applications has always been considered the boring part of development, with tons of boilerplate code, and making upfront decisions around how it will be done, or retrofit afterwards. However, with dotnet core, things have changed, it’s never been easier to implement effective visibility into how your application is performing in production.

In this session I will cover the fundamental differences between Metrics and Logs, and Events and look at where one is useful over the other.

We’ll look at some of the things Microsoft has done in dotnet core to make logging easier, and some of the third-party libraries and tools that aim to make it easier to navigate.

We’ll cover tools like Serilog and Log4Net, along with AppMetrics for capturing application information. We’ll then take a quick look at Grafana, and see how we can make some sense of that information. Finally, we’ll look at Honeycomb.io and how they’re providing actionable insights for distributed systems using events, enabling testing in production.

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fvu2DJU-dFg

Enjoy this post? Subscribe!

Subscribe to our weekly Newsletter and stay tuned.

Roundup #46: .NET Core 1 EOL, EF Core 3.0, WCF OSS, Hidden Gems in .NET Core 3

Here are the things that caught my eye recently in .NET.  I’d love to hear what you found most interesting this week.  Let me know in the comments or on Twitter.

.NET Core 1.0/1.1 End of Life

Link: https://dotnet.microsoft.com/platform/support/policy/dotnet-core

Entity Framework Core 3.0 Preview 6 and Entity Framework 6.3 Preview 6

In recent months, a lot of our efforts have been focused on a new LINQ implementation for EF Core 3.0. Although the work isn’t complete and a lot of the intended functionality hasn’t been enabled, before preview 6 we reached a point in which we couldn’t make much more progress without integrating the new implementation into the codebase in the main branch.

More interesting for me is Entity Framework 6.3 which is to support .NET Standard 2.1. Reminder, that won’t be supported on .NET Framework as it is not intended to support netstandard2.1. Only .NET Core 3 as of this time will support netstandard2.1

Link: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/dotnet/announcing-entity-framework-core-3-0-preview-6-and-entity-framework-6-3-preview-6/

WF and WCF OSS projects

At the Build conference in May 2019, we mentioned that, after we add WinForms, WPF and Entity Framework 6 to .NET Core 3.0, we do not plan to add any more of the technologies from .NET Framework to .NET Core.

This means we will not be adding ASP.NET Web Forms, WCF, Windows Workflow, .NET Remoting and/or the various other smaller APIs to .NET Core. For new applications, there are better technologies that serve a similar purpose and provide more capabilities or better experiences. We think of .NET Core as the framework our customers will build brand new applications or port applications that they are still spending lots of engineering work on.

Link: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/dotnet/supporting-the-community-with-wf-and-wcf-oss-projects/

Hidden gems in .NET Core 3

You’ve likely heard about the headline features in .NET Core 3.0 including Blazor, gRPC, and Windows desktop app support, but what else is there? This is a big release so come and see David Fowler and Damian Edwards from the .NET Core team showcase their favorite new features you probably haven’t heard about in this demo-packed session.

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xdSSH63IZZc

Enjoy this post? Subscribe!

Subscribe to our weekly Newsletter and stay tuned.

Roundup #42: Nancy, BuildXL, String Params, Rider, Infra Code

Here are the things that caught my eye this week in .NET.  I’d love to hear what you found most interesting this week.  Let me know in the comments or on Twitter.

Nancy 2.0.0

Pretty sure everyone has been using Nancy 2.0.0-clinteastwood in production for the past 2 years but regardless, official 2.0 release.

Link: https://www.nuget.org/packages/Nancy/

BuildXL

Build Accelerator, BuildXL for short, is a build engine originally developed for large internal teams at Microsoft, and owned by the Tools for Software Engineers team, part of the Microsoft One Engineering System internal engineering group. Internally at Microsoft, BuildXL runs 30,000+ builds per day on monorepo codebases up to a half-terabyte in size with a half-million process executions per build, using distribution to thousands of datacenter machines and petabytes of source code, package, and build output caching. Thousands of developers use BuildXL on their desktops for faster builds even on mega-sized codebases.

Link: https://github.com/Microsoft/BuildXL

Efficient Params and String Formatting

This combination of features will increase the efficiency of formatting string values and passing of params style arguments.

Link:https://github.com/dotnet/csharplang/blob/master/proposals/format.md

Rider 2019.1

Link https://www.jetbrains.com/rider/whatsnew/#v2019-1

5 Lessons Learned From Writing Over 300,000 Lines of Infrastructure Code

This talk is a concise masterclass on how to write infrastructure code. I’ll share key lessons from the “Infrastructure Cookbook” we developed at Gruntwork while creating and maintaining a library of over 300,000 lines of infrastructure code that’s used in production by hundreds of companies. Come and hear our war stories, laugh about all the mistakes we’ve made along the way, and learn what Terraform, Packer, Docker, and Go look like in the wild. Topics include how to design infrastructure APIs, automated tests for infrastructure code, patterns for reuse and composition, patterns for zero-downtime deployments, refactoring, namespacing, versioning, CI / CD for infrastructure code, and more.

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTEgE2lcyk4

Enjoy this post? Subscribe!

Subscribe to our weekly Newsletter and stay tuned.