Blame yourself!

Came across a great blog post titled “Stop Blaming the System!” by Jurgen Appelo.  This really relates to my Status Quo post.  Stop blaming the system or using excuses like “that’s the way it is”.  Processes and systems were put in place by people to solve a specific problem.  Companies, processes, practices, and requirements all evolve and change.

When you recognize a constant pain point try and find a solution.  Just don’t let it go by as “that’s just the way it is”.  Take responsibility.

Agile and Beyond 2013

Jim Benson (@ourfounder), author of Personal Kanban, was the keynote speaker at this years Agile and Beyond conference.  Overall, I had a great time again this year and found the sessions I attended to be very insightful and reaffirmed some of my opinions.

One little thought I wanted to share was from Jim Benson’s keynote:

Velocity is the single most useless number invented by human beings.

Effort points are estimates.  Guesswork.  The velocity metric is a calculation of that guesswork.

We took something as inherently variable as an estimate and we gave it an integer value.

I thought this was pretty amusing when I really started to think about it.

Service Bus for Windows Server

Move over MSMQ, Service Bus for Windows Server was recently released.  Apparently it has been for awhile now (Oct 2012 release).  I’m just late to the party I guess.

Service Bus 1.0 was designed to allow for enterprise messaging capabilities in a Windows Server-based environment.  It enables you to build, test, and run loosely-coupled, message-driven applications in self-managed environments and on developer computers.  The two primary features are Service Bus Queues and Service Bus Topics and Subscriptions.

  • Service Bus Queues offer reliable message storage and retrieval with a choice of protocols and APIs. Use Service Bus queue in your application to provide load leveling by having the message receiver processing messages at its own pace or to provide load balancing by having multiple, competing receivers accepting messages from the same queue.

For more information on Service Bus queues refer to How to Use Service Bus Queues.

  • Service Bus Topics and Subscriptions offer (in addition to all of the queue’s) rich publish-subscribe capabilities allowing multiple, concurrent subscribers to independently retrieve filtered or unfiltered views of the published message stream.

If you are interested in or use messaging technology within your applications, this is some pretty exciting news.  Service Bus for Windows Server provides the same capabilities (Message Queues, Pub/Sub) as the Windows Azure Service Bus.  Best of all, it’s free.

It’s available for download now.  Also, check out the MSDN documentation.