Roundup #57: Dapr, .NET Core API Porting, EF Core 3 NETStandard2, ASP.NET Core Best Practices

Here are the things that caught my eye recently in .NET.  I’d love to hear what you found most interesting this week.  Let me know in the comments or on Twitter.

Announcing Distributed Application Runtime (Dapr)

Dapr is an open source, portable, event-driven runtime that makes it easy for developers to build resilient, microservice stateless and stateful applications that run on the cloud and edge. Dapr embraces the diversity of all programming languages and developer frameworks and simplifies building applications such as the e-commerce example.

Link: https://cloudblogs.microsoft.com/opensource/2019/10/16/announcing-dapr-open-source-project-build-microservice-applications/

.NET Core 3.0 concludes the .NET Framework API porting project

We started in .NET Core 1.0 with a very minimal API set that only included ~18K of the .NET Framework APIs. With .NET Standard 2.0, we tried to make it much more viable to share code between .NET Framework, .NET Core, and Xamarin which resulted in approximately 38K .NET Frameworks APIs being available in .NET Core 2.0. We also built the Windows Compatibility Pack which made another 21K .NET Framework APIs available to .NET Core, resulting in almost 60K additional APIs. And in .NET Core 3.0 we added WPF and WinForms, which increased the number of .NET Framework APIs ported to .NET Core to over 120k, which is more than half of all .NET Framework APIs.

Link: https://github.com/dotnet/announcements/issues/130

EF Core 3 to target .NET Standard 2.0

The feedback from you and others is that EF Core made the jump to .NET Standard 2.1 too soon. A lot of apps are still transitioning to .NET Core, and the ecosystem of libraries (especially WinForms and WPF) is also still translationing. Even UWP and Unity aren’t ready for .NET Standard 2.1 yet.

After investigating this, we discovered that a lot more of corefx has been backported to .NET Standard 2.0 than we originally anticipated when we made the decision to target .NET Standard 2.1.

Given your feedback and the unexpectedly low cost of maintenance–remember, we’re just a small team of five engineers–we decided it was probably worth implement this.

We hope that one last LTS release on .NET Standard 2.0 will give everyone a chance to catch up to the vision of .NET 5.

Link: https://github.com/aspnet/EntityFrameworkCore/issues/18141#issuecomment-542798580

ASP.NET Core Performance Best Practices

I never noticed this portion of the docs and found it really interesting to see some best practices, particularly around the performance reliability. I really like the DO vs DO NOT examples.

Link: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/performance/performance-best-practices?view=aspnetcore-3.0#performance-and-reliability

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Roundup #56: Blazor Server Performance, NetCore3 as Self-Contained, F# and Giraffe, Domain Modeling Made Functional

.NET Roundup

Here are the things that caught my eye recently in .NET.  I’d love to hear what you found most interesting this week.  Let me know in the comments or on Twitter.

Blazor Server in .NET Core 3.0 scenarios and performance

Since the release of Blazor Server with .NET Core 3.0 last month lots of folks have shared their excitement with us about being able to build client-side web UI with just .NET and C#. At the same time, we’ve also heard lots of questions about what Blazor Server is, how it relates to Blazor WebAssembly, and what scenarios Blazor Server is best suited for. Should you choose Blazor Server for your client-side web UI needs, or wait for Blazor WebAssembly? This post seeks to answer these questions, and to provide insights into how Blazor Server performs at scale and how we envision Blazor evolving in the future.

Link: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/aspnet/blazor-server-in-net-core-3-0-scenarios-and-performance/

Deploying .NET Core 3 apps as self-contained

Link: https://timheuer.com/blog/archive/2019/10/03/deploy-aspnet-core-applications-using-self-contained-dotnet-core.aspx

Yay! .NET Core 3.0 is now available!  You now are migrating your apps and want to get it to your favorite cloud hosting solution.  But they may not have it quite ready yet and you are still eager to deploy to production.  No worries, we have a solution for you.

F# and Giraffe with Stuart Lang

In this episode I interviewed Stuart about F#, Giraffe, the SAFE stack, and whether you should contemplate using a functional paradigm for web development. Some of you may know Stuart from his work on his website at stu.dev, or the events DDD southwest.comF# Bristol and .NET Southwest – all of which he helps to run.

Link: https://dotnetcore.show/episode-34-f-and-giraffe-with-stuart-lang/

Scott Wlaschin – Talk Session: Domain Modeling Made Functional

Statically typed functional programming languages encourage a very different way of thinking about types. The type system is your friend, not an annoyance, and can be used in many ways that might not be familiar to OO programmers.

Types can be used to represent the domain in a fine-grained, self documenting way. And in many cases, types can even be used to encode business rules so that you literally cannot create incorrect code. You can then use the static type checking almost as an instant unit test — making sure that your code is correct at compile time.

In this talk, we’ll look at some of the ways you can use types as part of a domain driven design process, with some simple real world examples. No jargon, no maths, and no prior FP experience necessary.

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLFl95c-IiU

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Roundup #55: .NET Core 3, F# 4.7, AWS joins .NET Foundation, .NET Foundation Maturity Model, Finding Service Boundaries

Here are the things that caught my eye recently in .NET.  I’d love to hear what you found most interesting this week.  Let me know in the comments or on Twitter.

Announcing .NET Core 3.0

We’re excited to announce the release of .NET Core 3.0. It includes many improvements, including adding Windows Forms and WPF, adding new JSON APIs, support for ARM64 and improving performance across the board. C# 8 is also part of this release, which includes nullable, async streams, and more patterns. F# 4.7 is included, and focused on relaxing syntax and targeting .NET Standard 2.0. You can start updating existing projects to target .NET Core 3.0 today. The release is compatible with previous versions, making updating easy.

Link: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/dotnet/announcing-net-core-3-0/

Announcing F# 4.7

We’re excited to announce general availability of F# 4.7 in conjunction with the .NET Core 3.0 release! In this post, I’ll show you how to get started, explain everything in F# 4.7 and give you a sneak peek at what we’re doing for the next version of F#.

Link: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/dotnet/announcing-f-4-7/

AWS Joins the .NET Foundation

We’re excited to announce today that AWS is joining the .NET Foundation as a corporate sponsor. AWS has a long-standing commitment to .NET, with a decade of experience running Microsoft Windows and .NET on AWSJoining the .NET Foundation is a natural step for us to further invest and participate in this community.

Link: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/opensource/aws-joins-the-net-foundation/

.NET Foundation Project Maturity Model

This proposal describes new approaches that we can use to improve the quality and quantity of .NET open source projects, and the .NET ecosystem generally. The .NET ecosystem is strong, but could be stronger still, and there are general challenges in open source projects that we should address in our ecosystem.

Link: https://github.com/dotnet-foundation/project-maturity-model

Context is King: Finding Service Boundaries Talk

Shameless plug of my own talk 🙂

Are you having trouble defining service boundaries? We know there are benefits in splitting up a complex system, such as more focused models and modular deployments.

Defining the correct service boundaries is incredibly important but can be pretty tricky. When defined correctly, the model feels natural and cohesive. Defined wrong can make a system overly complex and end in disaster.

Join Derek as he explores the use of key terminology in real business systems. How dissecting simple words and asking the right questions led to insights that helped define the service boundaries in real business systems developed over the last decade.

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dnhshUdRW70

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