Roundup #13: dotnet depends, httpbin.org, Own the future – Udi Dahan

Here are the things that caught my eye this week.  I’d love to hear what you found most interesting this week.  Let me know in the comments or on Twitter.

dotnet depends

dotnet depends v0.1.0 has now been released. This is a tool for exploring dependencies in .NET projects, with an GUI heavily inspired from bitbake’s depexp. Hopefully this tool will be a valuable addition to your toolbox when e.g. debugging transitive dependencies. Install it by running: dotnet tool install --global dotnet-depends, and report any issues and/or feature requests on Github.

Link: https://martinbjorkstrom.com/posts/2018-08-06-announcing-dotnet-depends

httpbin.org

A simple HTTP Request & Response Service.

Pretty neat little service and Docker container for testing various HTTP scenarios such as status codes, response cache headers, response formats, etc.

Link: https://httpbin.org/

Own the future – Udi Dahan

Many developers have struggled with the burden of designing, building, and running large complex software systems, swearing that – next time, they’ll do it right. And yet, even with all the alternative frameworks, patterns, and cloud services that have become available over the years, even new systems can’t seem to escape their big ball of mud fate.

But, there is another option available – just as challenging, but with a much brighter future. Organizations that can transform their technology, teams, management, and business will be the ones that own that future. While there’s no “cookie-cutter” approach to this transformation, Udi has some do’s and don’ts that will keep you from going astray.

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iYdKQXGY2E

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CCX8Sox6BNQ

 

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Roundup #12: TypeScript 3, EFCore.InMemoryHelpers, HTTP Caching, Standards.REST

Here are the things that caught my eye this week.  I’d love to hear what you found most interesting this week.  Let me know in the comments or on Twitter.

TypeScript 3.0

Which brings us to TypeScript 3.0! Despite the new big number, 3.0 has few breaking changes (meaning it should be veryeasy to upgrade) and introduces a new flexible and scalable way to structure your projects, powerful new support for operating on parameter lists, new types to enforce explicit checks, better JSX support, an overall better error UX, and much more!

Link: https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/typescript/2018/07/30/announcing-typescript-3-0/

 

EFCore.InMemoryHelpers

Provides a wrapper around the EF Core In-Memory Database Provider. Specifically works around the following EF bugs.

  • InMemory: Improve in-memory key generation
    Reasoning: For many bootstrapping and integration tests, the id generation should be predictable, i.e. an in-memory persistence should not share static mutable state. This is especially important when using unit tests as a bootstrap to generate ad-hoc data.
  • Add foreign key constraint checking to the in-memory provider
    Reasoning: It is desirable for foreign keys to be validated when running unit tests. This allows bugs to be caught earlier without the need for integration testing against a real database.
  • Add support for Timestamp/row version ([Timestamp], and .Property(p => p.X).IsRowVersion())
    Reasoning: It is desirable for exceptions to be thrown when a update violates a RowVersion. This allows bugs to be caught earlier without the need for integration testing against a real database.

Link: https://github.com/SimonCropp/EfCore.InMemoryHelpers

 

HTTP Caching – Client and Network Caching with RFC 7234

Learn how to skip making requests that you may not need to make, so you can avoid wasting time and energy processing uneccessary requests.

Highly recommend watching this.  Especially since I think ETags seem underused not just for caching purposes but for optimistic concurrency.

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=761puUy8ir4

 

Standards.REST

A collection of standards and specifications, that help make fantastic HTTP/REST APIs. Don’t reinvent the wheel, use fantastic wheels, hashed out by experts, that solve problems you hadn’t even considered yet.

As mentioned in the above talk by Phil Sturgeon, the site provides a list of RFC’s for common problems when building an HTTP API.

Link: http://standards.rest/

 

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Roundup #11: Solution-wide NuGet packages, REST vs. GraphQL, The Power of Roslyn, Blazor 0.5.0

Here are the things that caught my eye this week.  I’d love to hear what you found most interesting this week.  Let me know in the comments or on Twitter.

Solution-wide Nuget package version handling with MsBuild 15+

In order to centrally manage package versions, you can now leverage the Directory.Build.targets feature. Without going into too much detail (the linked document explains it well), Directory.Build.targets can be used to provide customizations to project files located under a certain directory (within a directory tree).

I remember seeing this from David Kean several months back on Twitter.  This is incredibly useful for keeping versions of packages consistent across projects.

Link: https://www.strathweb.com/2018/07/solution-wide-nuget-package-version-handling-with-msbuild-15/

 

REST vs. GraphQL: A Critical Review

Here is the idea: If you have never heard about the REST architectural style constraints and their implication on the properties of the resulting distributed system and you do not want to (or can’t) educate yourself, use GraphQL.

With all the buzz on Twitter about REST and GraphQL, I figured I’d toss this post in the mix.  Worth reading the comments as well to get a bigger picture.  Seems like people either sit in the REST (not CRUD but with Hypermedia) or the GraphQL camp, and nowhere in between.

Link: https://blog.goodapi.co/rest-vs-graphql-a-critical-review-5f77392658e7

 

The Power of Roslyn – Kasey Uhlenhuth

Four years ago we open sourced the C# and Visual Basic compilers and exposed their functionality through APIs as the Roslyn project. The Roslyn analyzer API empowers the developer community to be more productive by lighting up their own features in the editor in real-time–meaning anyone can write a refactoring, code fix, code style rule, or code diagnostic.

Come learn more about the Roslyn project, new APIs we’re adding, and what these live analyzers mean for you and your productivity.

I’ve always been interested in writing an Roslyn Analyzer but just wasn’t really sure where or how to get started.  If you feel the same, I recommend checking out this talk.

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nXljhGDokqA

 

Blazor 0.5.0

Blazor 0.5.0 is now available! This release explores scenarios where Blazor is run in a separate process from the rendering process. Specifically, Blazor 0.5.0 enables the option to run Blazor on the server and then handle all UI interactions over a SignalR connection. This release also adds some very early support for debugging your Blazor .NET code in the browser!

Pretty interesting to see the updates to the JavaScript interop.  I felt like in previous versions this was the most awkward part of Blazor.

Link: https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/webdev/2018/07/25/blazor-0-5-0-experimental-release-now-available/

 

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